Monday, 29 June 2015

Cha "Hong Kong" Poetry Contest






Hong Kong

A Cha Poetry contest




This contest is run by Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. It is for unpublished poems on the theme of "Hong Kong". 

Judges:

  • Tammy Ho Lai-Ming is a Hong Kong-born poet. She is a founding co-editor of Cha
  • Jason Eng Hun Lee has been published in a number of journals and he has been a finalist for numerous international prizes, including the Melita Hume Poetry Prize (2012) and the Hong Kong University's Poetry Prize (2010).
Rules:
  • Each poet can submit up to two poems (no more than 80 lines long each).
  • Poems must be previously unpublished. 
  • Entry is free.
Closing date:
  • 31 July 2015
Prizes:
  • First: £50, Second: £30, Third: £15, Highly Commended (up to 5): £10 each. (Payable through Paypal.)
  • All winning poems (including the highly recommended ones) will receive first publication in a special section in the Eighth Anniversary Issue of Cha, due out in December 2015.
The prizes were generously donated by an anonymous patron who loves Hong Kong.
Submission:
  • Submissions should be sent to t@asiancha.com with the subject line "Hong Kong".
  • Poems must be sent in the body of the email.
  • Please also include a short biography of no more than 30 words.
Previous Cha contests:



Sunday, 21 June 2015

"Please Do Not Film Me" — ASIAN CHA Issue#28 Editorial



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PLEASE DO NOT FILM ME

In May this year, I was fortunate enough to be invited by poet Ricardo de Ungria to be a foreign panellist on the second week of the 54th Silliman University National Writers Workshop in Dumaguete, the Philippines. The workshop is the oldest of its kind in Asia, and I cannot say strongly enough how much I enjoyed the experience, and how welcomed, taken care of and intellectually stimulated I felt while I was there. My co-panellists César Ruiz Aquino, Patricia Evangelista and Eliza Victoria also constantly impressed me with their knowledge, wit and humility.

There was one little episode, however, that discomfited me. During my one-week stay, apart from the daily workshops in which we discussed pieces written by the very talented poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction fellows, I also gave a lecture titled "Ghosts in the Machine: Photographs and Poems." When I walked into the room in the Silliman University library where my talk was taking place, the first thing I noticed was the video cameras. I froze. I panicked. I then entreated Rina Fernandez and Philip Van Peel, staff at the English Department of the university, not to film the talk. They very kindly indulged my irrational request.

You see, I have a condition. I have a physical revulsion of video cameras when I know that I am their subject, target, victim. There have been a few rare exceptions, but as a general rule, the thought of another me captured on film and alive—talking, smiling, sulking, moving around and breathing—makes me nervous, frightens me even. I assume it must have something to do with movement and sound as I am more or less fine with having my photograph taken. But I find terrifying the thought of more Tammy Hos out there, on repeat, having escaped the frame, moving in secret, finding new audiences, talking in my voice but completely unable to hear my wishes. Do they know they are merely copies of me, inferior but forever younger? Do they know I want them deleted?

I have had this psychological inhibition for quite a while, and I have previously declined commercial opportunities when I was asked to talk in front of a camera. I have been flattered by the invitations and mildly tempted by the financial rewards. But thanks, no thanks. Other times, I have tried to avoid the camera, only to find it was avoiding me. Once at Hong Kong Baptist University, just before the start of a short story prize-giving ceremony (I was one of the three judges), I asked the technician not to film me while I was giving my short speech, only for him to retort that the video cameras were for the keynote speaker (emphasis his). I was more relieved than embarrassed. I relate this story often, not only to amuse others but to remind myself that I am not that important.

In his description of John Berger's 1972 BBC miniseries Ways of Seeing, the critic Oliver Preston writes: 
I prefer the pleasures of the moving image, not least of which is Berger himself: his wide eyes, his unerringly grave gestures of address, his haircut. […] In a favourite scene, a gaggle of schoolchildren crowd around an image of Caravaggio's Supper at Emmaus, speaking over one another, calling out their interpretations of the painting's central figure. Berger, sitting among them, grave as ever, inclines his shaggy head and listens. (Paris Review)
I prefer the pleasures of the moving image too, but of others, not of myself.

I sometimes worry that my reluctance to be filmed could limit me in a world saturated with moving images, may stop people from inviting me to give lectures, talks, seminars or make public appearances. But then I remind myself not to get carried away, not to worry about problems that haven't occurred yet, to keep things in perspective. The future's not ours to see; video is for the keynote speaker. 

A photograph, still, thankfully, of me from Dumaguete, listening to a question put to me by an audience member. My head leans a little forward. I am not grave at all. (Photograph by Sha'ianne Molas Lawas)
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Tammy Ho Lai-Ming / Co-editor
Cha
21 June 2015


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Tuesday, 16 June 2015

Cha - Call for Submissions - Eighth Anniversary Issue (December 2015)

due out in December 2015.
-


Cha: An Asian Literary Journal
is now calling for submissions for the Eighth Anniversary Issue, scheduled for publication in December 2015.

Please send in (preferably Asian-themed) poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, reviews, photography & art for consideration. Submission guidelines can be found here. Deadline: 15 September 2015.
.
Arthur Leung (poetry) and Royston Tester (prose) will act as guest editors and read the submissions with the editors Tamara Ho and Jeff Zroback. Please contact Reviews Editor Eddie Tay at eddie@asiancha.com if you want to review a book or have a book reviewed in the journal.
.
We love returning contributors - past contributors are very welcome to send us their new works.

If you have any questions, please feel free to write to any of the Cha staff at editors@asiancha.com.-



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-- ,

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

An invitation to the launch of Cha co-editor Tammy Ho's Hula Hooping




Hula Hooping

chameleon press
and Tammy Ho Lai-Ming
invite you to a reception for the launch of
Hula Hooping, her first collection of poetry.
Tuesday 28 April, 6:30-8:00pm
(announcements at 7:00pm)

Karin Weber Gallery
20 Aberdeen Street, Central





Saturday, 11 April 2015

The March 2015 Issue of Cha is HERE.




http://www.asiancha.com 


The March 2015 Issue of Cha is HERE


The delayed March 2015 Issue of Cha is here. We would like to thank guest editors Dorothy Chan (poetry) and David Raphael Israel (prose) for reading the submissions with us and helping us put together the new edition. We would also like to thank Eddie Tay for the fine selection of book reviews and Vinita Agrawal for reading the contest poems and writing a commentary. The issue includes an editorial titled "A Wintry Hypothesis" by Tammy Ho Lai-Ming.

The following writers/artists have generously allowed us to showcase their work:

The Other Side Poetry: Xi Xi, Jennifer Feeley, Lian-Hee Wee, Louise Ho, Ting Wei Tai, Stephen Cloud, Joshua Burns, Michael Gray, Deborah Guzzi, Martin Kovan 
"The Other Side" poetry contest winners: Arian Tejano, Arup K Chatterjee, B.B.P. Hosmillo, Lachlan Brown, Ken Jackson, Aditi Rao, Brian Ng, Carissa Ma
Fiction: Henry Wei Leung, Kyra Ballesteros, Charles Hayes, Fatima Lim-Wilson 
Creative non-fiction: Christopher Hill
Photography & art: Eddie Tay, Edgar Yuanbo Mao (cover artist), John Fredricks
Reviews: Elen Turner, Alice Tsay, Chloe Li, Arielle Stambler, Emily Chow  

Our next issue, Issue 28, will be published in June 2015. We are currently accepting submissions for Issue 29, scheduled for September 2015. If you are interested in having your work considered for inclusion in Cha, please read our submission guidelines carefully.


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Friday, 10 April 2015

Cha - Call for Submissions - Issue 29 (September 2015)

due out in September 2015.
-
http://asiancha.com


Cha: An Asian Literary Journal
 is now calling for submissions for Issue 29, scheduled for publication in September 2015.

Please send in (preferably Asian-themed) poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, reviews, photography & art for consideration. Submission guidelines can be found here. Deadline: 15 June 2015.

Marc Vincenz (poetry) and David William Hill (prose) will act as guest editors and read the submissions with the editors Tamara Ho and Jeff Zroback. Please contact Reviews Editor Eddie Tay at eddie@asiancha.com if you want to review a book or have a book reviewed in the journal.

We love returning contributors - past contributors are very welcome to send us their new works.

If you have any questions, please feel free to write to any of the Cha staff at editors@asiancha.com.-
-- ,

Sunday, 8 March 2015

Cha "The Other Side" Poetry Contest — Finalists






The Other Side

A Cha Poetry contest


http://www.asiancha.com
This contest is run by Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. It is for unpublished poems on the theme of "The Other Side".

SHORTLISTED POETS
(click the pictures to learn more)
 https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1068986346450588/?type=1&theaterhttps://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1069320796417143/?type=1&permPage=1
https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1070001396349083/?type=1&permPage=1 https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1070136136335609/?type=1&permPage=1
https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1069323386416884/?type=1&permPage=1https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1070099693005920/?type=1 
https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1069573343058555/?type=1&permPage=1https://www.facebook.com/AsianCha.Journal/photos/a.207920079223890.62771.206856675996897/1068989986450224/?type=1&permPage=1


Judges:
  • Tammy Ho Lai-Ming, a Hong Kong-born poet, is founding co-editor of Cha. Her latest project is Desde Hong Kong: Poets in conversation with Octávio Paz.
  • Vinita Agrawal, author of Words Not Spoken, is a Mumbai-based, award winning-poet and writer. She was nominated for the Best of the Net Awards 2011 and awarded first prize in the Wordweavers Contest 2014, commendation prize in the All India Poetry Competition 2014 and won the 2014 Hour of Writes Contest twice.
Prizes:
  • First: £30, Second: £20, Third: £15, Highly Commended (up to 5): £10 each. (Payable through Paypal.)
  • All winning poems (including the highly recommended ones) will receive first publication in a special section in the March 2015 issue of Cha.
The prizes were generously donated by a reader living in Australia.
Previous Cha contests:



Sunday, 4 January 2015

Cha "The Other Side" Poetry Contest






The Other Side

A Cha Poetry contest



http://www.asiancha.com

This contest is run by Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. It is for unpublished poems on the theme of "The Other Side".

::: SEE THE FINALISTS HERE ::: 

::: SEE THE WINNERS HERE :::

Judges:
  • Tammy Ho Lai-Ming, a Hong Kong-born poet, is founding co-editor of Cha. Her latest project is Desde Hong Kong: Poets in conversation with Octávio Paz.
  • Vinita Agrawal, author of Words Not Spoken, is a Mumbai-based, award winning-poet and writer. She was nominated for the Best of the Net Awards 2011 and awarded first prize in the Wordweavers Contest 2014, commendation prize in the All India Poetry Competition 2014 and won the 2014 Hour of Writes Contest twice.
Rules:
  • Each poet can submit up to two poems (no more than 80 lines long each).
  • Poems must be previously unpublished
  • Entry is free.
Closing date:
  • 15 February 2015
Prizes:
  • First: £30, Second: £20, Third: £15, Highly Commended (up to 5): £10 each. (Payable through Paypal.)
  • All winning poems (including the highly recommended ones) will receive first publication in a special section in the March 2015 issue of Cha.
The prizes were generously donated by a reader living in Australia.
Submission:
  • Submissions should be sent to t@asiancha.com with the subject line "The Other Side".
  • Poems must be sent in the body of the email.
  • Please also include a short biography of no more than 30 words.
Previous Cha contests:



Thursday, 1 January 2015

The Seventh Anniversary Issue of Cha is HERE.


http://www.asiancha.com
 
The Seventh Anniversary Issue of Cha is HERE


We would like to thank guest editors Arthur Leung (poetry) and Royston Tester (prose) for reading the submissions with us and helping us put together the new edition. We would also like to thank Eddie Tay for another fine selection of book reviews and Jason Hun Eng Lee for reading the contest poems and writing a commentary on the poems. The issue includes an editorial titled "The Last Book" by Tammy Ho Lai-Ming.

The following writers/artists have generously allowed us to showcase their work:

Ravi Shankar, Joseph Stanton, Chen Chen, Rajiv Mohabir, Varsha Saraiya-Shah, Zhang Jieqiang, Amalia B. Bueno, Angela Gabrielle Fabunan, Jess C Scott, Joshua Burns, Chip Dameron, Camille Rivera, Bob Bradshaw

http://www.asiancha.com/content/blogcategory/267/484/

 Jeffrey Javier, Manjiri Indurkar, Naveed Alam, Robert Perchan, Jyotsna Jha, Meg Eden Kuyatt, L.S. Bassen

http://www.asiancha.com/content/blogcategory/268/486/

Lo Mei Wa, Manson Wong, David William Hill

Thaddeus Rutkowski, Gabriel Jensen Bloch, Erica Plouffe Lazure, Clara Chow

Nurulhuda Arslan

Chris Leung (cover artist), Bob Percival, Kathlene Postma, Ivy Poon, Amy Lewis

Glen Hamilton, Henry W. Leung, Michael Tsang, Karen Ma, Emily Chow, Carolyn Lau, Lu Jin, Elen Turner, William Noseworthy

Our next issue is due out in March 2015. We are currently accepting submissions for Issue 28, scheduled for June 2015. If you are interested in having your work considered for inclusion in Cha, please read our submission guidelines carefully.
.
.
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Thursday, 18 December 2014

Cha - Call for Submissions - Issue 28 (June 2015)

due out in June 2015.
-
http://www.asiancha.com


Cha: An Asian Literary Journal
 is now calling for submissions for Issue 28, scheduled for publication in June 2015.

Please send in (preferably Asian-themed) poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, reviews, photography & art for consideration. Submission guidelines can be found here. Deadline: 15 March 2015.

Jenna Le (poetry) and Daryl Yam (prose) will act as guest editors and read the submissions with the editors Tammy Ho and Jeff Zroback. Please contact Reviews Editor Eddie Tay at eddie@asiancha.com if you want to review a book or have a book reviewed in the journal.

We love returning contributors - past contributors are very welcome to send us their new works.

If you have any questions, please feel free to write to any of the Cha staff at editors@asiancha.com.-
-- ,

Tuesday, 9 December 2014

Cha "Reconciliation" Poetry Contest - 8 winning poems






Reconciliation

A Cha Poetry contest




This contest is run by Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. It is for unpublished poems on the theme of "Reconciliation" 
We have selected the following eight winning poems, which will all be published in the Seventh Anniversary Issue of Cha, due out in late December 2014 or early January 2015. 

// Naveed Alam, "Wagah-Atari"
// L.S. Bassen, "Aunt Esther"
// Manjiri Indurkar, "Schizophrenia"
// Jeffrey Javier, "Blackout"
// Jeffrey Javier, "Missing"
// Jyotsna Jha, "Everything Is In Place Except Me"
// Meg Eden Kuyatt, "Portrait in a Fujisaki Apartment"
// Robert Perchan, "Miss Min's Monday Morning Magic"


Judges:

  • Tammy Ho Lai-Ming is a Hong Kong-born poet. She is a founding co-editor of Cha
  • Jason Eng Hun Lee has been published in a number of journals and he has been a finalist for numerous international prizes, including the Melita Hume Poetry Prize (2012) and the Hong Kong University's Poetry Prize (2010).
Prizes:
  • First: £50, Second: £30, Third: £15, Highly Commended (up to 5): £10 each. (Payable through Paypal.)
  • All winning poems (including the highly recommended ones) will receive first publication in a special section in the Seventh Anniversary Issue of Cha.
The prizes were generously donated by an expat reader residing in Hong Kong.

Previous Cha contests:



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